Text

Solo Book Club - Week 40

Okay so. I finished Mage’s Blood. And… I liked it, but something stuck out to me. And looking at the amazon reviews, I wasn’t the only one that noticed.

David Hair does a lot of good character work, magic work, and plot work here, that is commendable and enjoyable.

The problem is… well.

Let me just quote a poster here:

… Here’s what bothered me about it: the countries and the cultures of the book bear a striking similarity to real-world cultures, primarily those of the Indian subcontinent and Middle East. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with that in and of itself, but it’s the WAY he does it that really irks me. It doesn’t come across as an homage or even artistic inspiration…it comes across more like historical plagiarism. You can really see it in the names of places, such as Hebusalim, which you can really read as Jerusalem, and is also evident in words and phrases, such as Ramita’s “bindu” mark on her forehead, which is clearly a traditional Indian bindi, just with one letter changed. It reeks of lazy-author syndrome…

And that’s really, all the bad things I COULD say about this book. I honestly think David Hair wanted to write a book about the 3rd crusades, but with magic, and somehow slip India in there somehow, and got lazy halfway through and didn’t bother changing a lot of the names and such.

I know in the acknowledgements he says he had people help him do research. I just wish his editor sat him down and told him that he shouldn’t be this blatant and to rework, or reimagine some of these things. Instead of going for authenticity, go for a flavouring.

Anyway, since it’s Spoopy season, I’ve switched gears slightly doing some horror.

I started Fevre Dream by George R.R Martin, which will be the second of his books on this list.

Holy shit, I just noticed I’m 3 books behind!! I gotta catch up in a big way!

Completed:

  1. Throne of the Crescent Moon; Saladin Ahmed
  2. The Spirit Thief; Rachel Aaron
  3. The Spirit Rebellion; Rachel Aaron
  4. The Spirit Eater; Rachel Aaron
  5. Promise of Blood; Brian McClellan
  6. The Spirit War; Rachel Aaron
  7. Spirits End; Rachel Aaron
  8. The Dwarves; Markus Heitz
  9. Broken Blade; Kelly McCullough
  10. A Dance of Cloaks; David Dalglish
  11. Crewel Lye; Piers Anthony
  12. Path of Anger; Antoine Rouaud
  13. Miserere: An Autumn Tale; Teresa Frohock
  14. The Eye of the World; Robert Jordan
  15. Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons & Dragons and The People Who Play It; David M. Ewalt
  16. Stormcaller; Tom Lloyd
  17. Knife Sworn; Mazarkis Williams
  18. The Daylight War; Peter V Brett
  19. A Natural History of Dragons: A Memoir by Lady Trent; Marie Brennan
  20. Blood Song; Anthony Ryan
  21. Dance of Blades; David Dalglish
  22. Gallow: The Crimson Shield; Nathan Hawke
  23. Heartwood; Freya Robertson
  24. Blood’s Pride; Evie Manieri
  25. Dragon’s Gold; Piers Anthony, Robert E. Margroff
  26. The Lies of Locke Lamora; Scott Lynch
  27. Dying of the Light; George R. R. Martin
  28. The Black Prism; Brent Weeks
  29. The Blinding Knife; Brent Weeks
  30. Ender’s Game; Orson Scott Card
  31. The Prince of Fools; Mark Lawrence
  32. The Palace Job; Patrick Weekes
  33. Imager; L.E. Modesitt Jr.
  34. The Broken Eye; Brent Weeks
  35. The Tropic of Serpents: A Memoir by Lady Trent; Marie Brennan
  36. Going Postal; Terry Pratchett
  37. Mage’s Blood; David Hair
Photoset

barkharley:

IT IS THE FIRST OF OCTOBER

IT IS TIME

TIME FOR SPOOKY SCARY SKELETONS

(via this-is-cthulhu-privilege)

Photo
worldofdarkness-eyecandy:


Artwork by:  Anotherwanderer

worldofdarkness-eyecandy:

Artwork by:  Anotherwanderer

Photo
scifi-fantasy-horror:

Grommash hellscream by JIHUN LEE

scifi-fantasy-horror:

Grommash hellscream by JIHUN LEE

Photo
dungeoncrawlersltd:

Setessa (THEROS) by AdamPaquette
Photo
pachipachisakana:

Am I kicked out of the fandom yet

pachipachisakana:

Am I kicked out of the fandom yet

(via pyrefly-skies)

Photo
worldofdarkness-eyecandy:


Artwork by:  Adrian Grajdeanu

worldofdarkness-eyecandy:

Artwork by:  Adrian Grajdeanu

Photo
scifi-fantasy-horror:

by TANG
Tags: Queue Art Tang
Photoset

commandertheory:

teysa-orzhov-rules-lawyer:

Steven Belledin
transcendent master
etched monstrosity
scornful aether-lich
ego erasure

searchlight geist
surrender

Does transcendent master have a jetpack???

Steven Belledin doesn’t know how to draw faces

(Source: ghostofleo, via commandertheory)

Photo
izhmash:

Jodon Smoth
Following in his father’s footsteps.

izhmash:

Jodon Smoth

Following in his father’s footsteps.

(Source: fuckyeahdementia, via wtfisthinprivilege)

Photo

(Source: feellng, via 23claw)

Photo

(Source: doors85, via 23claw)

Photo
sagansense:

The Loneliness of the Long-Abandoned Space Observatory
Space observatories are among some of the most magnificent buildings devoted entirely to science — because their windows look out on the universe. And their distinctive shape makes them into poignant ruins. Here are some observatories whose views onto space have been lost to time.
Cointe Observatory, Liège, Belgium, designed by Lambert Noppius and built in 1881-1882.The Mohon del Trigo, built in 1902 in the Sierra Nevada, Andalucia, Spain. Abandoned since the 1970s.Warner & Swasey Observatory in Cleveland, Ohio, constructed in 1919 by Worchester R. Warner and Ambrose Swasey. It had a 9.5-inch refractor after its opening, but later a 24-inch Burrell Schmidt and a 36-inch Cassegrain telesope were installed. Due to the growing light pollution in the city a new observatory was built and the complex was sold in 1983. It’s abandoned since then.
The small Knightridge Space Observatory with a four-ton telescope, built in 1936 and 1937, Bloomington, Indiana.
The castle-like Pip Ivan Observatory, on the top of a mountain named Pip Ivan in Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine. It was erected in 1937 and it was used for only a year by Polish astronomers. The Red Army captured the building in 1938 and used it as a meteorological station. The complex is abandoned since 1944.The Felix Aguilar Observatory, Argentina.
The working and the abandoned Portage Lake Observatory, Dexter, Michigan, operated by the University of Michigan.Innisfil Observatory, Innisfil, Ontario, Canada, built in 1975 by Heinz Lorenz, closed in the 1990s due to growing light pollution. The equipment was removed in 1997, and the building was converted to a house. Now it’s abandoned.An abandoned observatory in Odorheiu Secuiesc, Romania. Construction started in 1989, but stopped a year later.
Main image: Abandoned Knightridge Space Observatory, Bloomington, Indiana
Source: io9

sagansense:

The Loneliness of the Long-Abandoned Space Observatory

Space observatories are among some of the most magnificent buildings devoted entirely to science — because their windows look out on the universe. And their distinctive shape makes them into poignant ruins. Here are some observatories whose views onto space have been lost to time.

Cointe Observatory, Liège, Belgium, designed by Lambert Noppius and built in 1881-1882.
imageimageThe Mohon del Trigo, built in 1902 in the Sierra Nevada, Andalucia, Spain. Abandoned since the 1970s.
imageimageimageimageimageimageWarner & Swasey Observatory in Cleveland, Ohio, constructed in 1919 by Worchester R. Warner and Ambrose Swasey. It had a 9.5-inch refractor after its opening, but later a 24-inch Burrell Schmidt and a 36-inch Cassegrain telesope were installed. Due to the growing light pollution in the city a new observatory was built and the complex was sold in 1983. It’s abandoned since then.
imageimageimageimageimageimageimage

The small Knightridge Space Observatory with a four-ton telescope, built in 1936 and 1937, Bloomington, Indiana.
imageimageimage

The castle-like Pip Ivan Observatory, on the top of a mountain named Pip Ivan in Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine. It was erected in 1937 and it was used for only a year by Polish astronomers. The Red Army captured the building in 1938 and used it as a meteorological station. The complex is abandoned since 1944.
imageimageimageimageimageThe Felix Aguilar Observatory, Argentina.
imageimageimageimage

The working and the abandoned Portage Lake Observatory, Dexter, Michigan, operated by the University of Michigan.
imageimageInnisfil Observatory, Innisfil, Ontario, Canada, built in 1975 by Heinz Lorenz, closed in the 1990s due to growing light pollution. The equipment was removed in 1997, and the building was converted to a house. Now it’s abandoned.
imageimageimageimageAn abandoned observatory in Odorheiu Secuiesc, Romania. Construction started in 1989, but stopped a year later.
imageimageimageimage

Main image: Abandoned Knightridge Space Observatory, Bloomington, Indiana

Source: io9

(via dungeoninspiration)

Photoset

reptila-tequila:

qeilla:

thefreckledavantgardegoober:

mysticmisfit89:

Meanwhile, in prehistoric Canada…..

No no, you don’t understand, moose really do get that big. Take it from a Canadian. I’ve seen that bullshit in person. Scary as all heck.

And that’s how people can die if they hit a moose. Seriously, one of our fears when driving in the country is having to deal with this scenario of a moose jumping out in front of the car.

moose are actual legit ice age megafauna; theyve been here since the ice age, they are old as fuck. they also are pretty terrifying and ive echoed this before but i went to wiki and “In terms of raw numbers, they attack more people than bears and wolves combined” and “ In the Americas, moose injure more people than any other wild mammal and, worldwide, only hippopotamuses injure more.”

like, fuck off with that

(Source: outdooroddities.com, via austkyzor)

Photoset